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As a freelance writer, I offer clients well-researched and well-crafted articles, and I will turn cartwheels to meet editorial deadlines. References are available upon request.

I have written for The Toronto Star, The Toronto Sun, and Metroland Publishing (Careers, There’s No Place Like Home, etc.). Magazines include Canadian Architecture and Design, East of the City, and At Home in York Region.

My personal interests include food (preparing it, but particularly eating it!), interior design (my profession for the last 25+ years), travel (and, of course, the food), sailing, golf, and hobby farming (once you’ve bottled-fed a lamb, there’s no looking back).

VIRTUALLY PERFECT YOUR GAME
                                                                                  
I have never been able to figure out why my pitching wedge wasn’t working properly. Turns out it had nothing to do with the club … it was me. Go figure.
And I learned this bit of news by ‘stepping into the body’ of a golf pro and comparing my swing with theirs. How did I do that, you might ask?
At Whitby’s new golf learning center, Virtually Perfect, owner Leo Plue gave me my first lesson using ‘virtual reality’ technology. This interactive system, developed in Canada and based on teaching methods used by Ben Hogan and George Knudson, is completely different from any lesson you’ve had before.
After donning the 3D glasses and strapping on the ‘fanny pack’ of recording equipment, I molded my stance to fit the image in front of me. Together, the virtual pro and I took a back swing, I adjusted the club face, and we followed through. There I was, looking and feeling like Lorie Kane chipping for the big prize. And that’s when I realized I no longer had to leave my pitching wedge in the trunk of the car.

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MULMUR RESIDENCE
                                   
Burrowed comfortably into the side of a hill, on 75 acres of bucolic farmland on the Niagara Escarpment, is a charming rural homestead. Although it appears at first glance to be an antiquated farmhouse, modernized to include lofty panes of glass and a walk-out basement level, the original building is, in fact, a mere twelve years old. Standing on the rather ordinary front porch, the home appears to be an archetypal model of a two-storey ranch house, complete with weathered wood exterior and a pair of field stone chimneys. What gives the home the illusion of age is the weather-worn board-and-batten cladding and an abundance of stonework. The result is an authentic-looking reproduction which is at once impressive and humble.

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